Nov
30
6:15 PM18:15

Uprising 13/13: Satyagraha

This event will take place at Columbia University's Maison Francaise. If you are interested in attending, please send an email explaining your interest to Anna Krauthamer at ak4035@columbia.edu. This seminar will feature Banu Bargu of UC Santa Cruz, Karuna Mantena of Yale University, Uday Mehta of CUNY, Akeel Bilgrami of Columbia University, Bernard E. Harcourt, Director of the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, and Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco, Chair of the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. The seminars will be open to all.

The purpose of this seminar series is to explore various modalities of uprising, disobedience, inservitude, revolt, or other forms of political contestation. Instead of including them all under the name of “revolution”—a term that has become conceptually and historically fraught—the seminar will consider how specific experiences and discourses articulate new forms of upheaval or reformulate well-known ones. By focusing on this conceptual, historical and political problematic, we intend to shine a light on experiences and manifestations that take place at the local and at the global level, as well as at the subjective and the collective level. The idea is to articulate how critical political practice is expressed and understood today.

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Dec
14
6:15 PM18:15

Uprising 13/13: Revolt - Foucault in Iran

This event will take place at Columbia University's Casa Hispanica. If you are interested in attending, please send an email explaining your interest to Anna Krauthamer at ak4035@columbia.edu. This seminar will feature Daniel Defert, an editor of Michel Foucault, Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi of the University of Illinois at Urbana, Judith Revel of Université Paris Nanterre, John Rajchman of Columbia University, Bernard E. Harcourt, Director of the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, and Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco, Chair of the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. The seminars will be open to all.

The purpose of this seminar series is to explore various modalities of uprising, disobedience, inservitude, revolt, or other forms of political contestation. Instead of including them all under the name of “revolution”—a term that has become conceptually and historically fraught—the seminar will consider how specific experiences and discourses articulate new forms of upheaval or reformulate well-known ones. By focusing on this conceptual, historical and political problematic, we intend to shine a light on experiences and manifestations that take place at the local and at the global level, as well as at the subjective and the collective level. The idea is to articulate how critical political practice is expressed and understood today.

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Dec
14
6:30 PM18:30

Constructing Identities: Modigliani and Cultural Appropriation

This event will take place at the Scheuer Auditorium of the Jewish Museum. To register, click here.

This conversation with artists Brendan Fernandes and Aliza Nisenbaum, moderated by Joshua Cohen, Assistant Professor, African Art History, The City College of New York, revisits the work of Amedeo Modigliani through the 21st-century lens of formal and cultural appropriation. As these artists engage with layered notions of identity and incorporation of “other” subjects and elements in their own practices, they consider what is at stake in trying to inhabit a visual language or persona that is not one's own.  What prompts this gesture of identification, and how do we go about reading degrees of cultural hijacking, appreciation, or both, at once?

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Nov
16
4:30 PM16:30

Feminist to the Core: Psychoanalysis, Contemporary Art and Feminism

This event will take place in room 754 of Schermerhorn Extension (IRWGS seminar room). No ticket or reservation is required.

Rosalyn Deutsche teaches art history at Barnard College and is the author of Evictions: Art and Spatial Politics, which investigates the politics of space in art, architecture, and urban planning and design.

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Nov
16
4:00 PM16:00

Populism and Religion: The Popular and Elite Roots of Republican Extremism in the United States

This event will take place in room 707 of the International Affairs Building, the Lindsay Rogers Room. Theda Skocpol, a professor of government and sociology at Harvard University, will be speaking. To register, click here.

To explain the distinct but intertwined popular and elite roots of Republican extremism in the United States, Skocpol draws on her research on the Tea Party, on the Koch political network, and on local developments in eight pro-Trump counties in non-big-city areas of North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Wisconsin. In that latter project, she is repeatedly visiting the study counties and conducting interviews with residents, local media, and community leaders to discover their reactions to political conflicts and policy shifts in the unfolding Trump presidency.

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Nov
15
7:00 PM19:00

Philosophy in the Library: Corey Robin on the Reactionary Mind

This event will take place at the Dweck Center of the Brooklyn Public Library. To register, click here.

Late in life, William F. Buckley made a confession to Corey Robin. Capitalism is "boring," said the founding father of the American right. "Devoting your life to it," as conservatives do, "is horrifying if only because it's so repetitious. It's like sex." With this unlikely conversation began Robin's decade-long foray into the conservative mind. What is conservatism, and what's truly at stake for its proponents? If capitalism bores them, what excites them?

Written by a keen, highly regarded observer of the contemporary political scene, Robin's newly reissued The Reactionary Mind ranges widely, from Edmund Burke to Antonin Scalia, from John C. Calhoun to Ayn Rand. It advances the notion that all rightwing ideologies, from the eighteenth century through today, are historical improvisations on a theme: the felt experience of having power, seeing it threatened, and trying to win it back. The new edition includes a chapter on Donald Trump.

Mr. Robin will be in conversation with Eddie Glaude, a professor of Religion and African-American Studies at Princeton. His books on religion and philosophy include African American Religion: A Very Short Introduction and Exodus! Religion, Race and Nation in Early 19th Century Black America, which was awarded the Modern Language Association’s William Sanders Scarborough Book Prize.

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Nov
14
7:00 PM19:00

Victor Sebestyen on Lenin

This event will take place at the Book Culture on Columbus (450 Columbus Avenue). No ticket is necessary, but you can click here to RSVP on Facebook.

On Tuesday, November 14th at 7pm, Book Culture on Columbus and Harper's Magazine present Victor Sebestyen for a discussion of his new biography, LENIN: The Man, the Dictator, and the Master of Terror.

Victor Sebestyen’s riveting biography of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin—the first major biography in English in nearly two decades—is not only a political examination of one of the most important historical figures of the twentieth century but also a fascinating portrait of Lenin the man.

Brought up in comfort and with a passion for hunting and fishing, chess, and the English classics, Lenin was radicalized after the execution of his brother in 1887. Sebestyen traces the story from Lenin’s early years to his long exile in Europe and return to Petrograd in 1917 to lead the first Communist revolution in history. Uniquely, Sebestyen has discovered that throughout Lenin’s life his closest relationships were with his mother, his sisters, his wife, and his mistress. The long-suppressed story told here of the love triangle that Lenin had with his wife, Nadezhda Krupskaya, and his beautiful, married mistress and comrade, Inessa Armand, reveals a more complicated character than that of the coldly one-dimensional leader of the Bolshevik Revolution.

With Lenin’s personal papers and those of other leading political figures now available, Sebestyen gives is new details that bring to life the dramatic and gripping story of how Lenin seized power in a coup and ran his revolutionary state. The product of a violent, tyrannical, and corrupt Russia, he chillingly authorized the deaths of thousands of people and created a system based on the idea that political terror against opponents was justified for a greater ideal. An old comrade what had once admired him said that Lenin “desired the good . . . but created evil.” This included his invention of Stalin, who would take Lenin’s system of the gulag and the secret police to horrifying new heights.

In Lenin, Victor Sebestyen has written a brilliant portrait of this dictator as a complex and ruthless figure, and he also brings to light important new revelations about the Russian Revolution, a pivotal point in modern history.

Victor Sebestyen was born in Budapest. He has worked as a journalist on many newspapers including The Times, The Daily Mail, and The London Evening Standard. He has written for many American publications, including The New York Times.

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Nov
9
6:15 PM18:15

Uprising 13/13: #BlackLivesMatter

This event will take place at the Jerome Greene Annex. If you are interested in attending, please send an email explaining your interest to Anna Krauthamer at ak4035@columbia.edu. This seminar will feature Keeanga-Yamattha Taylor of Princeton University, Kendall Thomas of Columbia University, Bernard E. Harcourt, Director of the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, and Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco, Chair of the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. The seminars will be open to all.

The purpose of this seminar series is to explore various modalities of uprising, disobedience, inservitude, revolt, or other forms of political contestation. Instead of including them all under the name of “revolution”—a term that has become conceptually and historically fraught—the seminar will consider how specific experiences and discourses articulate new forms of upheaval or reformulate well-known ones. By focusing on this conceptual, historical and political problematic, we intend to shine a light on experiences and manifestations that take place at the local and at the global level, as well as at the subjective and the collective level. The idea is to articulate how critical political practice is expressed and understood today.

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Nov
3
7:30 PM19:30

Capitalism: A Debate

This event will take place at the Tishman Auditorium at NYU School of Law. Get tickets for $5 here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/capitalism-a-debate-tickets-38663109401?aff=efbeventtix

Is capitalism the best way to improve standards of living, ensure political and economic freedom, and provide opportunity? Could socialism do better? A debate between Reason and Jacobin magazines, moderated by Michelle Goldberg, columnist for The New York Times. The debate features Nick Gillespie and Katherine Mangu-Ward (for Reason) and Vivek Chibber and Bhaskar Sunkara (for Jacobin).

Reason is the libertarian magazine of "Free Minds and Free Markets." Jacobin is a leading voice of the American left, offering socialist perspectives on politics, economics, and culture. Michelle Goldberg is an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, and the author of several books including “Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism,” “The Means of Reproduction: Sex, Power, and the Future of the World.” Nick Gillespie is editor in chief of Reason.com and Reason TV, the online platforms of Reason. Katherine Mangu-Ward is editor in chief of Reason and a Future Tense Fellow at New America. Vivek Chibber is a professor of sociology at New York University and the co-editor of Catalyst. His latest book is "Postcolonial Theory and the Specter of Capital". Bhaskar Sunkara is the founding editor of Jacobin.

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Oct
27
12:00 PM12:00

Power, Subjectivity, and Data

This event will take place in room 103 of the William & June Warren building. If you are interested in attending, please send an RSVP email to Anna Krauthamer at ak4035@columbia.edu. This talk will feature Tung-Hui Hu of the University of Michigan, Colin Koopman of the University of Oregon, Natasha Schüll of New York University, and Bernard Harcourt of Columbia University.

How are contemporary practices of surveillance, social media, digital-ness, and data transforming the contours of subjectivity? What modes of power and knowledge are operating on our networked selves?  How do these powers and rationalities work on a minute technical level to reshape our identities and our identity categories? These questions have enormous stakes in our contemporary age of big data and mass surveillance.  Their investigation can be a site of productive critique today, both interrogating the conditions of
possibility of subjectivity and also reinvigorating the terms of critical scholarship.  Following the lead of Michel Foucault’s “history of the present” this workshop is focused on the possibilities for critical philosophy today in the midst of emergent forms of power, knowledge, and subjectivity.

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Oct
27
12:00 PM12:00

Infopower and Expository Power: The Digital Age

Tung-Hui Hu of the University of Michigan, Colin Koopman of the University of Oregon, and Natasha Schüll of New York University will all be speaking. This event will take place at Columbia University.

How are contemporary practices of surveillance, social media, digital-ness, and data transforming the contours of subjectivity? What modes of power and knowledge are operating on our networked selves?  How do these powers and rationalities work on a minute technical level to reshape our identities and our identity categories? These questions have enormous stakes in our contemporary age of big data and mass surveillance.  Their investigation can be a site of productive critique today, both interrogating the conditions of possibility of subjectivity and also reinvigorating the terms of critical scholarship.  Following the lead of Michel Foucault’s “history of the present” this workshop is focused on the possibilities for critical philosophy today in the midst of emergent forms of power, knowledge, and subjectivity.

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Oct
26
6:15 PM18:15

Uprising 13/13: Uprising

This event will take place at the Jerome Greene Annex. If you are interested in attending, please send an email explaining your interest to Anna Krauthamer at ak4035@columbia.edu. This seminar will feature Tariq Ali, an author from London, Soha Bayoumi of Harvard University, Nada Moumtaz of the University of Toronto, Bernard E. Harcourt, Director of the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, and Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco, Chair of the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. The seminars will be open to all.

The purpose of this seminar series is to explore various modalities of uprising, disobedience, inservitude, revolt, or other forms of political contestation. Instead of including them all under the name of “revolution”—a term that has become conceptually and historically fraught—the seminar will consider how specific experiences and discourses articulate new forms of upheaval or reformulate well-known ones. By focusing on this conceptual, historical and political problematic, we intend to shine a light on experiences and manifestations that take place at the local and at the global level, as well as at the subjective and the collective level. The idea is to articulate how critical political practice is expressed and understood today.

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Oct
26
4:10 PM16:10

Populism and Religion: Religious Accommodations and “Equal But Different” Citizenship

This event will take place in room 707 of the International Affairs Building, the Lindsay Rogers Room. Registration is required here. Rogers Smith, a professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, will be speaking.

Even as controversies continue to rage over preferential treatment for racial and ethnic minorities, many religious conservatives are contending with mounting intensity that their religious liberty is endangered if they are not exempted from a wide range of statutory and even constitutional requirements, including duties to provide medical insurance coverage for contraceptives; to refuse to serve LGBTQ customers; to refrain from endorsing political candidates if they wish to retain tax exemptions; and others. This paper argues that public policymakers, including courts, should subject all denials of such accommodations to strict scrutiny, granting exemptions unless their denial is necessary for compelling state interests. Religious accommodations, like other forms of differential treatment, often can advance goals of egalitarian civic inclusion and reduce resentments that contribute to conservative populist movements-- so long as the exemptions do not go so far as to represent acquiescence in denials of basic rights of persons.

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Oct
24
6:30 PM18:30

All Together Different: Yiddish Socialists, Garment Workers, and the Labor Roots of Multiculturalism

This event will take place at the Workmen's Circle Headquarters (247 W 37th Street, 5th Floor) and is co-presented by the Workmen’s Circle, The Sidney Hillman FoundationBrooklyn Institute for Social Research, Dissent Magazine, and The Jewish Solidarity Caucus of D.S.A. RSVP here to attend.

 As part of our Activist Book Series, join us as we continue our regular labor and activist – focused discussions by welcoming author Daniel Katz, who will present and lead a conversation examining the historic roots of Yiddish Socialism in the radical Jewish tradition, along with its influence and inspiration for today’s activism of resistance.

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Oct
24
6:00 PM18:00

The New School Anthropocene Series: Extreme Cities

This event will take place at the New School's Wolff Conference Room in the Albert and Vera List Academic Center, D1103 (address: 6 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10003, Room D1103). This event will feature a conversation between Ashley Dawson, author of Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change, and Stephanie Wakefield. It is sponsored by Verso Books and the New School.

How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? In Extreme Cities, Ashley Dawson argues that cities are ground zero for climate change, contributing the lion’s share of carbon to the atmosphere, while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world’s megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. Instead, most continue to develop luxury waterfront condos for the elite and industrial facilities for corporations. In Extreme Cities, Dawson offers an alarming portrait of the future of our cities, describing the efforts of Staten Island, New York, and Shishmareff, Alaska residents to relocate; Holland’s models for defending against the seas; and the development of New York City before and after Hurricane Sandy. Our best hope lies not with fortified sea walls, he argues. Rather, it lies with urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way.

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Oct
23
6:30 PM18:30

Journalism, Socialism, and Design

This event will take place in room 607B of Pullitzer Hall. Remeike Forbes, Elizabeth Mahony, and Bhaskar Sunkara of Jacobin Magazine will be speaking. 

Journalism is supposedly straight down the middle stuff—so what happens when you add a strong socialist perspective into the picture? The Delacorte fellows at the Columbia Journalism Review invite you to a special discussion on progressive journalism with the editorial staff of Jacobin Magazine. Pizza will be provided!

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Oct
17
7:00 PM19:00

Philosophy in the Library: Saam Trivedi on the Emotions of Music

This event will take place at the Dweck Center of the Brooklyn Public Library. To register, click here.

Saam Trivedi, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Brooklyn College, discusses the emotions as well as some philosophical theories of musical expressiveness and arousal. He is the author of Imagination, Music, and the Emotions: A Philosophical Study (2017), and many articles.

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Oct
16
6:00 PM18:00

Explorations in the Medical Humanities: Inventions of the Soul

This event will take place in the Second Floor Common Room of the Heyman Center. Jesús Rodríguez-Velasco, Professor and Chair of the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University, will be speaking. Rishi Goyal, a doctor and scholar, will be responding.

How and why would the legal discipline become interested in the science of the soul? In this talk, Jesús R. Velasco will offer an idea of the importance of this science of the soul, its interdisciplinarity, and some of its theoretical issues. He will focus on one case of juridical appropriation of the science of the soul in which the legislator gives a legal and political reading of the cognitive processes that form Aristotelian aesthetics and 'psychology'. His main thesis is that the legal appropriation of the soul involves the articulation of systems of mutual surveillance among what medieval law called personae fictae, or what we normally refer to as the juridical person or the juridical subject. These forms of mutual surveillance are part of a biopolitical and governmental project that lies at the basis of the very configuration of a juridical subject. This configuration gradually erodes the notion of “nature,” only to replace it with a juridical institution that also carries the name of “nature.” This talk will focus mainly on the Mediterranean discussions about the soul, the psyche, cognitive process, and their appropriation in the realms of theology and law.As a set of disciplines, the humanities face the challenge of how to write about embodied experiences that resist easy verbal categorization such as illness, pain, and healing. The recent emergence of interdisciplinary frameworks such as narrative medicine goes some way to address these challenges. Yet conceptualizing a field of medical humanities also offers a broader umbrella under which to study the influence of medico-scientific ideas and practices on society.  Whether by incorporating material culture such as medical artefacts, performing symptomatic readings of poems and novels, or excavating the implicit medical assumptions underlying auditory cultures, the approaches that emerge from a historiographical or interpretive framework are different from those coming from the physician’s black bag.

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Oct
13
1:00 PM13:00

Pious Technologies and Secular Designs

This event will take place in Avery Library's Wood Auditorium. Richard Wittman of UC Santa Barbara, Lucia Allais of Princeton University, Kendrick Oliver of University of Southampton, Kathryn Lofton of Yale University, Peter Collopy of California Institute of Technology, Irene Cheng of California College of the Arts, Nasser Rabbat of MIT, and Brian Larkin of Columbia University will all be speaking. For more information, click here.

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Oct
9
6:30 PM18:30

Arch-Art - A Conduit to Context: The Role of Buildings in Social Change

This event will take place in the Wood Auditorium of Avery Hall.

James Wines, winner of the 2013 National Design Award for Lifetime Achievement, is the founder and president of SITE, an environmental art and design organization chartered in New York City in 1970. His architecture, landscape and public space designs are based on a response to surrounding contexts. His book entitled DE-ARCHITECTURE was released in 1987 by Rizzoli International and, in 2000, Taschen Verlag in Germany published GREEN ARCHITECTURE. He has designed and built more than one hundred and fifty projects for private and municipal clients in eleven countries. He is the recipient of twenty-five art and design awards, including the 1995 Chrysler Award for Design Innovation. James Wines is also a Professor of Architecture at Penn State University. The main focus of his current work is on the fusion of art, architecture, landscape and the surrounding context. He continues to write and lecture on integrative thinking and environmental issues internationally.

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Oct
6
1:00 PM13:00

Writing and Dissent

This event will be held in the Ware Lounge of Avery Hall. Editors and contributors of the Avery Review, such as Karen Abrams, Kadambari Baxi, Michael Sorkin, and Anoordha Iyer Siddiqi, will be speaking.

The election and inauguration of Donald J. Trump as the president of the United States of America provoked an unprecedented intensity of reflection in virtually all academic disciplines. The professions of architecture and planning, faced with the phenomenon of a self-proclaimed "builder-in-chief," have found themselves facing a series of fundamental questions, both old and new. How should we think, teach, and practice under a developer presidency? What sort of walls will we and won't we choose to build? What are our commitments of critical thought, and what obligations should we turn our energies toward?

Eight months into Trump’s term, the Avery Review is publishing And Now: Architecture Against a Developer Presidency, which brings together a series of critical essays that explore the nature of architecture's many long-standing complicities. Architecture coordinates colossal expenditures (of material, of energy); it scripts forms of labor (in its construction, in its operation, and in the programs it houses); and it is both a repository and generator of capital. Architecture participates, centrally, in defining modes of life, whether for the privileged or the dispossessed—designing and building the boundaries between the "haves" and the "have-nots." This fundamental reality of architectural practice need not inspire either nihilism or defensiveness but should rather be understood, quite simply, as the terrain we navigate. Naming these complicities and the injustices they perpetuate is a first step toward addressing them.

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Oct
5
6:15 PM18:15

Uprising 13/13: Insurgency

This event will take place in the Second Floor Common Room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. If you are interested in attending, please send an email explaining your interest to Anna Krauthamer at ak4035@columbia.edu. This seminar will feature Claudia Pozzana, Associate Professor in the Department of History and Cultures at Bologna University; Alessandro Russo, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Bologna; Bernard E. Harcourt, Director of the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought; and Jesus Rodriguez-Velasco, Chair of the Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures at Columbia University. The seminars will be open to all.

The purpose of this seminar series is to explore various modalities of uprising, disobedience, inservitude, revolt, or other forms of political contestation. Instead of including them all under the name of “revolution”—a term that has become conceptually and historically fraught—the seminar will consider how specific experiences and discourses articulate new forms of upheaval or reformulate well-known ones. By focusing on this conceptual, historical and political problematic, we intend to shine a light on experiences and manifestations that take place at the local and at the global level, as well as at the subjective and the collective level. The idea is to articulate how critical political practice is expressed and understood today.

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Oct
5
4:00 PM16:00

Feminist to the Core: Puccini’s La Bohème

This event will take place in room 523 of Butler Library. Feminist to the Core: Puccini’s La Bohème features Naomi André (Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan), Mary Birnbaum (Juilliard School), Professor Suzanne Cusick (Professor of Music, NYU), and Annie Randall (Professor of Music, Bucknell University) in conversation about this year’s Music Humanities opera, Puccini’s La Bohème. 

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Oct
2
6:00 PM18:00

Silencing the Body: Hypnosis, Music, and Pain in the 19th Century

This event will take place in the Second Floor Common Room of Columbia University's Heyman Center. Céline Frigau Manning, associate professor at the Institut Universitaire de France, will be speaking and Joelle M. Abi-Rached, lecturer in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University, will be responding.

In many 19th century narratives, hypnosis was the treatment of last resort in order to tackle persistent pain and attain what René Leriche would subsequently call the “silence of the organs.” Faced with such an adversary, hypnosis and music became part of a rhetoric of spectacle, with public displays of insensibility to pain culminating in musical sequences, or pain itself being used with music to create performative trance states. Though hypnosis has been the subject of a vast body of clinical investigation and historical scholarship, the history of its relationship to music remains unwritten. This talk will explore various narratives of this interaction in an attempt to understand how experiments involving music and hypnosis influenced both doctors’ and patients’ moral understanding of bodies in pain.

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Sep
28
4:10 PM16:10

Populism and Religion: Religious Populisms, Right and Left, in Europe and the Americas

This event will take place in room 707 of Columbia's International Affairs Building, the Lindsay Rogers Room. Registration required here. Dr. Jose Casanova, a professor of sociology and theology at Georgetown University, will be speaking.

We are witnessing a global emergence of populist movements throughout the world, reacting diversely to discontents connected with ongoing processes of globalization and with the crisis of representation of liberal democracy. Most of the populisms are not per se “religious” but there are some intriguing religious dimensions to many of them. In Europe, one can discern various combinations of anti-EU and anti-globalist nationalist populisms, anti-immigrant nativist populisms, anti-Muslim and anti-Semitic Christian and secularist populisms, and paradoxically the formation of transnational alliances of right-wing anti-liberal, anti-feminist and anti-gay religious populisms sponsored by Putin’s Russia and the Moscow Patriarchate. In the US, a country with an old historical tradition of WASP nativist populism, we witnessed diverse forms of right-wing religious and not-religious populism coalescing in the election of Trump. A comparison with the left-wing populism of Bernie Sanders, with transnational popular movements such as the 3 T’s (Tierra, Techo y Trabajo) or the pan-Amazonian indigenous movements sponsored by Pope Francis and the Catholic Church in Latin America, or the anti-liberal and anti-parliamentarian populism of the Italian Five Star movement, Spanish Podemosor the Catalan CUP( Candidatura d’Unitat Popular) points to the global crisis of legitimation of liberal democracy.

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Sep
21
7:00 PM19:00

A Poetics of Politics? A talk by Terrance Hayes

Terrance Hayes is the author of several books of poetry, including How to Be Drawn; Lighthead, which won the 2010 National Book Award for poetry; Muscular Music, which won the Kate Tufts Discovery Award; and Hip Logic, winner of the 2001 National Poetry Series. A recipient of a fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation, he is a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, poetry editor at New York Times Magazine, and Distinguished Writer in Residence at NYU.

This event will take place in the Second Floor Common Room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. 

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Sep
14
6:15 PM18:15

Uprising 13/13: The Modern Concept of Revolution

This lecture will take place at the Low Library Rotunda. Columbia University professors Etienne Balibar, Simona Forti, and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak will be speaking. It is organized and run by Columbia University professors Bernard E. Harcourt, and Jesús R. Velasco. For more information on the Uprising 13/13 series, visit http://blogs.law.columbia.edu/uprising1313/

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Sep
11
6:00 PM18:00

The Whiteness of Bones: The Emergence of the Human Skeleton as a Commodity, 1500 - 1800

The human skeleton became an object—scientific, natural, artistic, and artisanal—in the period between the late 15th century and the late 18th century. While retaining its symbolic value, in this period the skeleton became essential both to anatomists and to artists as the bedrock of the human form. As a valued commodity, skeletons were bought and sold, and entered public and private collections. Anatomical manuals included instructions on their crafting. This talk will examine who owned skeletons, who used them, and who made them, and the fact that their origins as dead humans remained curiously unexpressed.

This event will take place at the Heyman Center's second floor common room. The speakers are Anita Guerrini, Horning Professor in the Humanities and Professor of History at Oregon Statue University, as well as Pamela H. Smith, Seth Low Professor of History at Columbia University.

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Jun
24
to Jun 28

A Vision of Resistance: Peter Nestler

A retrospective of the work of acclaimed postwar German filmmaker Peter Nestler, hosted by the Film Society of Lincoln Center. Nestler was an incisive critic of fascism and a "precise observer of the poetry and politics of labor...[who] spent five decades chronicling how things get made, whether in a factory or at the level of ideology." Nestler himself will be present for a series of Q&A sessions accompanying the screenings. For more information, visit the Goethe Institut's website.

The event will take place at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, located at 144 West 65th Street.

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